Friday, March 1, 2024

Success is always flow.


I decided not to run for US Congress in my Nebraska District 2.   

The unit of analysis is the person times decisions they (helped to) make. Let that be clear!

I know personally and do not anymore trust the future performance as my representative in Congress of either of the two main candidates, highlighted in the first comment below from their last confrontation. Yet, I don't have the energy and desire to waste my time trying to raise $1.5 million to "beat" either and both of them. It's a strong feeling of mine that the heat/inspiration pump we established and are growing with The Science Club at Yates Illuminates will have a much stronger impact than my serving in Congress, despite my personal conviction that we shall make the US much more like Omaha altogether—to get along well among neighbors and to build things together, bubbling from the ground up. That's after all how we founded this country in its past and how we are continuing to be showcasing ground up solutions to the world.

It's just not going to be my time wasted in Washington's gridlock. Now: for those of us who take the time to learn…

You made the effort to register and come to school. You're paying dearly and you'll be paying even much more dearly over time ahead.

At 19 you dress like at 19. "No suit and tie for [you]. A suit and tie is for old people and I'm certainly not old."

"Texas sucks." was a stereotype I must have heard thousands of times by twenty+ years ago. I had a student from Dallas in a large first year of university class in South East Michigan about this time twenty years ago. I let her speak often as she was opinionated and was always ready to answer many of my provocative questions asked of everyone. Then I had to help defend her because others had differing views and they were all of a sudden more interested in speaking themselves once the Dallas born student had started the conversation. I had previously argued in Texas's favor with a history professor (today) friend of mine who disliked the U.S. more than it deserved to be disliked based on my learning early in my high school days about the role Texas Instruments had played in the development of our information society revolution.

But then I learned much more myself. I wish the same upon everyone on this earth, but particularly so to all my neighbors in this election season.

Think about it. You ate chicken today? It was inspected because of a law that was helped to be passed by President Lyndon B Johnson. Maybe LBJ and implicit state laws saved your life.

Never ever settle for what you're told, especially by those who have an interest to fool you to adopt their stereotypes and nonsense. Do your due diligence work and settle for preferences rooted in solutions offered feasibly by folks with a real track record of success in doing things.

Science is in everything we do and take advantage of every day. Never let anyone tell you or have you believe otherwise.

Success is always flow. There's more of us.

Wednesday, February 21, 2024

How to help young learners grow?

How to help young learners grow? 

👉First of all: be ready much before the newborns are born. Then continue to always stay _readier_ as they grow and learn more. If you're not ready for science how do you think you'll be able to help them?
👉Second: Show them how to ask and answer tough questions about everything from earliest on in life.
👉Third: Help with learning where inspiration must always come from and how. Remember that no matter what we've done as a species, nature did it first. Nature still does—& will always do—it much better & we will forever have to learn from it. 
👉Fourth: Help them recognize their strengths _and_ limitations, and why we as a species can only do great things in teams, even if those are most often asynchronous.
👉Fifth: Understand well what is a school system and what does it, can it, and should it do. Brief: any school system is designed for _scale_. Any individual is unique. Don't ever allow the need to societally learn at scale to kill or even just mildly reduce each one learner's (your each and every kid's) individuality. Then set to prepare your children for it. From day one. Every day. For life. And no: your fancy gaming/video tablet or smartphone is not your co-parent or babysitter. It's just a brain killer if not used correctly. Schooling shall _complement_ and amplify learning from home and from life experiences themselves. Never just replace those. 
👉Sixth: Help everyone travel. As far and as wide as you can imagine. Also as deep and as narrow as you can imagine. And beyond. With the mind, and certainly with the body too, but not just with the body. Learn from there. You and your young learners will never be the same. 
👉Seventh: Always live tomorrow, never yesterday. Yesteryear & yestercentury are good for learning from them, but to relive them would really be the dumbest. Never trust anyone taking you back to some past. Realize how much they're misleading you and just call their bluff.
👉Eight: Understand the system you and your family live in. Understand it well. This is fundamental. Even language can not help you fully unless you're ready to question it—language itself—as well. Remember all the blind people👨‍🦯👩‍🦯🧑‍🦯explaining an elephant 🐘. Before you ever looked from above 🌗 how would you describe the world 🌍? Before you can describe it well how can you explain things it's impacted by? Then when some people try to mess with your understanding 🧠for their own benefit, how can you react if you didn't dedicate enough time and effort to figure out how they may want to trick you? Imagine then that you're there for your children all while you yourself may be tricked away from being able to represent their entire interests well enough… Take a simple issue: 🧓🛻👧🏫🅿️🅿️🅿️🅿️🚫🌳. What do we do about it? Only what we know we may… But what if we never learned we may do anything at all? Because we were prohibited subliminally from getting the entirety of the system?

👉Many will rob you with a pen.



Adrian kf0ohs S. Petrescu, Ph.D., J.D.
InnovationTrek

"I have learned the novice can often see things that the expert overlooks. All that is necessary is to not be afraid of making mistakes or appearing naive." Abraham Maslow (1908-70)
"Cogito, ergo sum" (Rene Descartes, 1596-1650) 
"Who is John Galt?"

Tuesday, November 28, 2023

You gotta add sellers—flows always grow to reach all elements of the system

image0.jpeg
Core defining variables are. must!
image1.jpeg

Above is a modest analysis of transportation (r-)evolution. It is
offered as an example on how we must address financial analysis of future growth of parts of the economic system pertaining to global mobility of goods and persons, from a constructal law perspective, as to be applied. 

Adrian S. Petrescu, Ph.D., J.D.
InnovationTrek

"I have learned the novice can often see things that the expert overlooks. All that is necessary is to not be afraid of making mistakes or appearing naive." Abraham Maslow (1908-70)
"Cogito, ergo sum" (Rene Descartes, 1596-1650) 
"Who is John Galt?"

Friday, August 18, 2023

We matters. A lot. Yet, to whom and in what way exactly?

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1-NbmrMYHRc7Zq7KOwfG6bKqqgfATnB8j

Adrian S. Petrescu, Ph.D., J.D.
InnovationTrek

"I have learned the novice can often see things that the expert overlooks. All that is necessary is to not be afraid of making mistakes or appearing naive." Abraham Maslow (1908-70)
"Cogito, ergo sum" (Rene Descartes, 1596-1650) 
"Who is John Galt?"

Wednesday, June 21, 2023

Let’s not confuse innovation with potentially criminally irresponsible conduct.

https://news.yahoo.com/oceangate-warned-potential-catastrophic-problems-114044476.html?soc_src=newsroom&soc_trk=com.apple.UIKit.activity.Mail&.tsrc=newsroom


Adrian S. Petrescu, Ph.D., J.D.
InnovationTrek

"I have learned the novice can often see things that the expert overlooks. All that is necessary is to not be afraid of making mistakes or appearing naive." Abraham Maslow (1908-70)
"Cogito, ergo sum" (Rene Descartes, 1596-1650) 
"Who is John Galt?"

Wednesday, May 24, 2023

CAS$H Motivates for Innovation.



Adrian S. Petrescu, Ph.D., J.D.
InnovationTrek

"I have learned the novice can often see things that the expert overlooks. All that is necessary is to not be afraid of making mistakes or appearing naive." Abraham Maslow (1908-70)
"Cogito, ergo sum" (Rene Descartes, 1596-1650) 
"Who is John Galt?"

Thursday, November 24, 2022

Brands and their value over time.

Let's remember homo sapiens believes in stories. Strongly so. Maybe much too strongly so. 

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:7000500231494602752?utm_source=share&utm_medium=member_ios


Adrian S. Petrescu, Ph.D., J.D.
InnovationTrek

"I have learned the novice can often see things that the expert overlooks. All that is necessary is to not be afraid of making mistakes or appearing naive." Abraham Maslow (1908-70)
"Cogito, ergo sum" (Rene Descartes, 1596-1650) 
"Who is John Galt?"